Events and Exhibitions: October 3 – 9, 2014

The Night of Perpetual Day – Yang Yongliang (杨泳梁 / 楊泳梁)

Lots of music events this week: A traditional Chinese music festival in Princeton, NJ and Carnegie Hall, the Modern Sky Festival which includes a number of well-known Chinese rock bands that would fit perfectly in Pitchfork, KEXP, or WFMU, and a talk about rock music and youth culture in China.

On the film side…

The Hou Hsiao-hsien retrospective continues at the Museum of the Moving Image with one of his best works A Time to Live and a Time to Die (童年往事).  EnMaze Pictures presents films by Chinese directors in North America.

BAM presents the films of absurdist martial arts comedy director Stephen Chow (周星馳 / 周星驰), and over at IFC Center, classic martial arts films that inspired the Wu-Tang Clan and films by Ang Lee, Zhang Yimou, and Quentin Tarantino get rare screenings.  Old-school martial arts films might get a bad rap these days for their cheesiness, but they can be a lot of fun and showcase a period in the unique culture of Hong Kong cinema.

Art…

It’s the last weekend to catch Prune Nourry’s two exhibitions Terracotta Daughters and Imbalance.   Take a look at our interview with Catherine Lan, who reimagines painting with use of fur a canvas and scissors as a brush.

You can always look ahead to events beyond the upcoming week by visiting our one-time and short term event and ongoing exhibition calendars.  Upcoming events also can be found on listing on the right side of this page.  New events and exhibitions are added as they come up.  Let us know if there’s anything we should add to the calendar!

We’re looking for contributors!  If you would like to do a write-up or contribute photos for an event, please email us at beyondchinatown[at]gmail.com.

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Upcoming Events

1) A Time to Live and a Time to Die (童年往事) – The centerpiece of Hou’s coming-of-age trilogy, bracketed by A Summer at Grandpa’s and Dust in the Wind, this “delicate, haunted drama” (Richard Brody, The New Yorker) is drawn from the director’s own memories of growing up in rural Taiwan after his family’s immigration from China. A Time to Live and a Time to Die follows Hou’s on-screen alter-ego Ah-hsiao (nicknamed “Ah-ha”) from 1947 to 1965, including an early immersion in street gang culture. The film’s scope poignantly depicts the toll of time, the presence-in-absence of the left-behind mainland, and Taiwan’s gradual changing of the generational guards. “[T]his unhurried family chronicle carries an emotional force and a historical significance… an excellent introduction to [Hou’s] work as a whole.” —Jonathan Rosenbaum (Museum of the Moving Image)

Part of the Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien retrospective.

Friday, October 3, 7 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria
Free with museum admission ($12/adults; $9/senior citizens, students;  $6/children (3-12))

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2) Daughter of the Nile (尼罗河的女儿 / 尼羅河的女兒) – In this vehicle for Taiwanese pop star Lin Yang, she plays a disaffected Kentucky Fried Chicken server looking after her wannabe gangster brother; her only escape is found in manga comic books. An outlier in Hou’s filmography, which found him working again with the producers of his early commercial romances and engaging with contemporary urban pop culture, this rarely screened film is ripe for rediscovery. “Hou’s formalist eye turns every shot into a study in absence and detachment, and his attention to the anomic rhythms of Taipei youth culture reminds one of Godard’s early 1960s portraits of Paris,” wrote James Quandt in Artforum. (Museum of the Moving Image)

Part of the Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien retrospective.

Saturday, October 4, 2:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria
Free with museum admission ($12/adults; $9/senior citizens, students;  $6/children (3-12))

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3) Princeton International Chinese Music Festival – Lectures and Demonstrations Led by Leading Professors and Master Musicians – Learn about Chinese music from these lectures:

Prof. Zhou Wang – Head of the Pluck Instrument Division in Central Conservatory of Music 周望教授 – 中央音乐学院民乐系弹拨乐教研室主任
Topic: Guzheng’s New Journey: Creation and Outlook of the Modern Days’ Guzheng Compositions 古筝的新历程:《现代古筝曲的创新和展望》

Prof. Chen Kun Peng – Dean of Chinese Instrument Dept., GuangXi Conservatory of Music 陈坤鹏教授 – 广西艺术学院民族艺术研究所所长
Topic: The Art and Outlook of the Single and Two Stringed Bow Instruments from China – Du Xian Qin and Erhu 《来自中国的独弦和双弦乐器 – 独弦琴和二胡的艺术和展望》

Mr. Zhou Zhan – 1st Guzheng, Chinese Broadcasting Orchestra 周展 – 中央广播乐团首席古筝演奏家
Topic: The Unique Articulation and History of Qin Zheng Music 《秦筝的独特韵味和历史》

Prof. Sheng Yang – Zhejiang Conservatory of Music 盛秧副教授 – 浙江音乐学院
Topic: The History and Character of the Zhejiang Zheng 《 浙派筝的历史和风格》

Saturday, October 4, 2:30 PM
Einstein Lecture Hall (Room 302 in Frist Campus Center), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Free

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4) Princeton International Chinese Music Festival Concert – Concert featuring professionals Chinese musicians from China and winners at the festival’s Chinese Music Competition

Saturday, October 4, 7 PM PM
Taplin Auditorium, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
$10/admission

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5) Princeton International Chinese Music Festival Closing Concert – This is the closing concert of the three-day festival program. Taking place at Princeton University and Carnegie Hall, the festival consists of a Chinese music competition, lectures, and concerts led by masters from China. The closing concert features the 2014 Best Guzheng Virtuosos named by China Central Television, such as Cui Shan and Cheng Hao-Ru, as well as masters and professors from the China, Central, GuangXi, and Zhejiang Conservatories of Music. They perform a series of new compositions, as well as traditional, modern, and folk music onguzhengerhu, and other Chinese instruments.

Sunday, October 5, 2 PM
Carnegie Hall, 881 7th Ave
$30 – $50/admission

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6) The Sandwich Man (儿子的大玩偶, 兒子的大玩偶) – Jointly directed by Hou and two of his close-knit compatriots from the progressive-minded film scene that convened at Edward Yang’s Taipei home, The Sandwich Man, along with 1982’s In Our Time, is widely regarded as comprising the opening shots of what would be called the Taiwanese New Cinema. A portmanteau film comprised of three separate segments illustrating life in Cold War Taiwan, when American influence and money were ubiquitous, the film’s title derives from the subject of the first segment, the Hou-directed The Son’s Big Doll, which concerns an impoverished young man who feeds his family by taking a job as a human signpost.

Part of the Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien retrospective.

Sunday, October 5, 5 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria
Free with museum admission ($12/adults; $9/senior citizens, students;  $6/children (3-12))

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7) 7 Grandmasters (虎豹龙蛇鹰绝拳 / 虎豹龍蛇鷹絕拳) – A kung fu teacher sets out to prove he is the greatest fighter by finding and defeating the 7 Grandmasters. One by one, he fights their wide variety of animal styles (tiger, leopard, mantis, monkey,etc.) He also puts a young student through elaborate training, and is followed by a mysterious villain in a weird hat. Let’s be honest though, how important is the plot when a jaw-dropping kung fu fight breaks out every few minutes? Featuring multiple silver-haired villains with huge sideburns and maniacal laughter, plus the best monkey-style kung fu fight ever put on film. Directed by the great Joseph Kuo and starring Jack Long and Mark Long. (IFC Center)

Sunday, October 5, 6:40 PM
IFC Center, 323 Avenue of the Americas
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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8) Growing Up (小毕的故事 / 小畢的故事) – The travails of Little Pi, an adolescent in 1950s Taiwan, are at the core of Growing Up, a film that initiated a meeting of minds vital to Taiwanese New Cinema. Little Pi’s experiences of young love and delinquency are narrated by a neighbor and classmate, a touch which suggests the unique perspective of the film’s screenwriting team: Hou and writer Chu Tien-wen, his close collaborator in years to come. Growing Up was Chu’s first venture into film, adapting her own novel, while director Chen Kun-hou was cinematographer on several of Hou’s early films, and a mentor of sorts. The rest, as they say, is film history.  (Museum of the Moving Image)

Part of the Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien retrospective.

Sunday, October 5, 7:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria
Free with museum admission ($12/adults; $9/senior citizens, students;  $6/children (3-12))

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9) Shaolin vs. Lama (少林斗喇嘛 / 少林鬥喇嘛) – A Tibetan Lama (not a llama) steals a sacred Shaolin manual outlining all 72 kung fu fighting styles. At the same time, a young street fighter goes to the Shaolin Temple and meets an alcoholic kung fu master who agrees to train him. The Lama villain becomes an unstoppable master who begins to unleash his fury at Shaolin, resulting in a flurry of vicious kung fu fights. Now it’s up to the young fighter to save the day with his “Buddha Finger” technique. This movie is non-stop ferocious kung fu madness! (IFC Center)

Sunday, October 5, 8:30PM
IFC Center, 323 Avenue of the Americas
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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10) The God of Cookery (食神) – Stephen Chow is at his wild and woolly best as a celebrity chef charlatan who is exposed as a fraud and must claw his way back up from the bottom to reclaim the title of “God of Cookery.” Culminating in a side-splittingly absurdist Iron Chef-style kitchen battle, this riotous kung food comedy is a bonkers blend of cooking, martial arts, and slapstick mayhem. (BAM)

Part of BAMcinématek’s series Stephen Chow: The King of Comedy

Monday, October 6, 7:30 PM
BAM Rose Cinemas, Peter Jay Sharp Building, Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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11) King of Beggars (武状元苏乞儿 / 武狀元蘇乞兒) – The spoiled son (Chow) of a Qing dynasty-era nobleman sets out to become a martial arts master in order to win the love of a courtesan—and winds up becoming a beggar in the process. This goofball “chopsocky” spoof is highlighted by one of Chow’s most brilliantly hilarious set pieces, in which he kung fu fights an opponent…whilst dozing off!  (BAM)

Part of BAMcinématek’s series Stephen Chow: The King of Comedy

Tuesday, October 7, 7 PM and 9:15 PM
BAM Rose Cinemas, Peter Jay Sharp Building, Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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12) Shaolin vs. Wu-Tang (少林与武当 / 少林與武當) – An evil lord murders a Wu Tang master in an attempt to turn the Shaolin and Wu Tang against each other. The two schools each begin training to prepare for a showdown while the villainous lord attempts to combine the two styles to become the supreme kung fu master. This is old school kung fu at its best, filled with excellent fight scenes, strange training sequences, martial arts weaponry, and an opening credit sequence that alone is worth the price of admission. Starring and directed by kung fu superstar Gordon Liu (36TH CHAMBER OF SHAOLIN) with fight choreography by the great Lau Kar Leung. (IFC Center)

Wednesday, October 8, 6:45 PM
IFC Center, 323 Avenue of the Americas
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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13) Justice, My Foot! (审死官 / 審死官) – Stephen Chow teamed up with the late Canto-pop superstar Anita Mui and fellow Hong Kong auteur Johnnie To for this deliriously freewheeling farce. He’s a crooked lawyer and she’s his butt-kicking, kung fu fighting wife who’s unable to have a child because of a karmic curse brought on by her husband’s unethical ways. Among the ensuing insanity: a barrage of rude, crude fart jokes and a Silence of the Lambs parody.  (BAM)

Tuesday, October 7, 7 PM and 9:15 PM
BAM Rose Cinemas, Peter Jay Sharp Building, Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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14) The Way to You – An evening of contemporary indie music from Taiwan.  Two sets by songstress Deserts Anpu (Zhang Xuan. 张悬 / 張懸) and one from Kuo Kuo of Forests and Algae.

Wednesday, October 8, 8 PM (Doors at 7:30 PM)
Spike Hill, 186 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn
$25 (sold out, but tickets might be available at the venue)

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15) The Invincible Armor (鹰爪铁布衫 / 鷹爪鐵布衫) – Hwang Jang Lee is an evil white-haired Eagle Claw villain, and master of the impenetrable “Iron Armour Technique”. When a young kung fu warrior is framed for murder, he’s forced to run for his life from the vicious villain. Now the young fighter must survive an onslaught of kung fu assaults, and master the “Iron Finger Style” to combat the crazed Eagle Claw master. This is wall to wall kung fu action featuring non-stop fight scenes, a ripped off Spaghetti Western soundtrack, and amazing fight choreography by Master Yuen Woo Ping. (IFC Center)

Wednesday, October 8, 8:30 PM
IFC Center, 323 Avenue of the Americas
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students

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16) Useless Rock: Youth Culture in the PRC – Lecture and discussion will explore the changing significance of rock music in China – including its critical potential – in a debate between Liang Long, the lead singer of Second Hand Rose, and Dr. Jeroen Groenewegen-Lau, the band’s percussionist and a scholar of Chinese Studies. The debate will be moderated by Eric de Fontenay, founder of MusicDish and MusicDish*China. (China Institute)

Thursday, October 9, 6:30 PM
China Institute, 125 E. 65th St.
$10/member; $15/non-member

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17) EnMaze Pictures – North American Chinese Director Short Film Tour – The New York stop of EnMaze Picture’s tour showcasing North American Chinese directors will screen:

-Door God, directed by Yulin Liu
-Caught, directed by Bruce Li
-The Right Thing, directed by Shan Jin
-Three Light Bulbs, directed by Min Ding
-A Heart Felt, directed by Jingyang Cheng
-So You’ve Grown Attached, directed by Kate Tsang

Thursday, October 9, 7 PM
Quad Cinema, 34 W 13th St # B
$18/admission

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18) MOCATALKS: Waves of Identity Curators Talk – Join Herb Tam and Yue Ma, curators of MOCA’s newest exhibition Waves of Identity: 35 Years of Archiving, for a discussion on this exhibition that examines Chinese American identity through MOCA’s collection of photographs, personal letters, artifacts and oral histories. They will unpack the process of developing and organizing this exhibition as well as the role archive materials play in interpreting the history of a community. (MOCA)

Thursday, October 9, 7 PM
Museum Of Chinese In America, 215 Centre Street
$12/Adult; $7/MOCA Member, Student & Senior

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19) King of Comedy (喜剧之王 / 喜劇之王) – Unable to cut it in the movie business, a hapless aspiring actor (Chow) has significantly more luck giving acting lessons to a call girl (Cheung)—and eventually finding romance. This manic showbiz satire is Chow’s most personally revealing, autobiographical work and boasts a dead-on John Woo spoof, a cameo by Jackie Chan, and a surreal finale involving a copious amount of Pringles. (BAM)

Part of BAMcinématek’s series Stephen Chow: The King of Comedy

Thursday, October 9, 7:30 PM and 9:30 PM
BAM Rose Cinemas, Peter Jay Sharp Building, Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn
$14/adult; $9/member; $10/senior citizens, students


Modern Sky Festival

China’s most prominent rock festival invades New York with a line-up that includes great indie rock and electronic bands from the the United States, Canada, China, and Taiwan.  See our post for the full line-up, links to the bands, and music videos, but here’s are the Chinese and Taiwanese bands and their scheduled set times.

Saturday:

Deserts Zhang Xuan (张悬 / 張懸) – 5:50 PM
Re-TROS (重塑雕像的权利 / 重塑雕像的權利) – 7:25 PM

Sunday:

Omnipotent Youth Society (万能青年旅店 / 萬能青年旅店) – 2:30 PM
Queen Sea Big Shark (后海大鲨鱼 / 后海大鯊魚) – 3:55 PM
Shuh Tou (舌头 / 舌頭) – 4:30 PM
Second Hand Rose (二手玫瑰) – 5:10 PM

Saturday, October 4 (5 – 10 PM)
Sunday, October 5 (2 – 8:30 PM)
Rumsey Playfield, Central Park (located right off the 5th Ave and 69th Street entrance)
Tickets: $48 – $150


Ongoing Films and Shows

Ning Hao’s (宁浩 / 寧浩) road trip romantic comedy Breakup Buddies (心花路放) will start a theatrical run soon.


Exhibitions

We put together available reviews of the current exhibitions in our Exhibition Review Roundup.  The exhibitions included in a roundup are marked with an asterisk.

Closing soon:

Prune Nourry: Terracotta Daughters (China Institute (downtown), 10/4)

Prune Nourry: Imbalance (Rio Grande, 179A Grand Street, 10/4)

Catherine Lan Solo Exhibition (The Center for Arts Education, 10/10)

Jian-Jun Zhang: Nature (Art Projects International, 10/11)

Opening and newly added:

ESC: Digital Artworks by C.J. Yeh (The Museum of FIT, 10/4 – 12/13)

Lu Zhang: All the Lost Souls (张璐: 所有丢失的灵魂 / 張璐: 所有丟失的靈魂) (Stephen Romano Gallery, 10/15 – 11/30)

Let us know if there’s something people need to see.

Visit the exhibition calendar (http://ow.ly/pxe9o) for details for the following shows below.  As always, check the museum or gallery’s website for hours of operation

Prune Nourry: Terracotta Daughters (China Institute (downtown), 10/4)

Prune Nourry: Imbalance (Rio Grande, 179A Grand Street, 10/4)

Catherine Lan Solo Exhibition (The Center for Arts Education, 10/10)

Jian-Jun Zhang: Nature (Art Projects International, 10/11)

James Chan: Human Investigation (Roux Roux Gallery, 10/22)

Cao Fei: LA Town (Lombard Freid Gallery, 10/25)

“If I Want Blue, I Paint with Orange” Xiaowei Chen Solo Exhibition (49B Studios, 10/30)

Li Daiyun: The Grid (Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, 11/1)

Liu Bolin: A Colorful World? (Klein Sun Gallery, 11/1)

Ai Weiwei (Part I) (Chambers Fine Art, 11/1)

Ai Weiwei (Part II) (Francis M. Naumann Fine Art, 11/1)

Zhang Huan: Evoking Tradition (Storm King Art Center, 11/9)

Zhai Liang: “New York is a Big Liar” (Fou Gallery, 11/15)

Lu Zhang: All the Lost Souls (张璐: 所有丢失的灵魂 / 張璐: 所有丟失的靈魂) (Stephen Romano Gallery, 11/30)

ESC: Digital Artworks by C.J. Yeh (The Museum of FIT, 12/13)

Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao’s New York: Assembled Realities (Museum of the City of New York, 10/15/14 – 2/15/15)

The Art of the Chinese Album (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 3/29/15)

*Phoenix: Xu Bing at the Cathedral (Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 2015)

Waves of Identity: 35 Years of Archiving (Museum of Chinese in America, 3/1/15)

Memory Prints: The Story World of Philip Chen (Museum of Chinese in America, 3/1/15)

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion (New York Historical Society, 4/19/15)

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution (China Institute, 4/26/15)

Group Shows

Li DaiyunJennifer Wen Ma and Xin Song in Finding New Realities (Fingesten Gallery, 9/23 – 10/14)

Image by The Night of Perpetual Day – Yang Yongliang (杨泳梁 / 楊泳梁) (detail from photo by Andrew Shiue)