Events and Exhibitions: March 20 – March 26, 2015

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This week’s listing starts predominantly with films before offering experimental music, the first Chinese Western opera singer, a vibraphone player, discussions about social issues, and food.

Congratulations to reader Grace Wang who won our raffle for a ticket to The Food of Taiwan author  Cathy Erway’s Taiwanese Pub Dinner at Jimmy’s No. 43!

We add listings to our one-time and short term event and ongoing exhibition calendars as we learn of them.  If you know of anything or would like to contribute photos or an article, shoot us an email at beyondchinatown@gmail.com.


Upcoming Events

1) In the Mood for Love (花样年华 / 花樣年華)A journalist and a secretary coincidentally rent apartments in the same building in Hong Kong on the same day. This is only the first of many chance encounters as the pair begins to find solace in each other while their spouses are away…

Listed as the 24th best film of all time in Sight and Sound’s 2012 critics poll.
Winner of the technical grand prize at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival.

“The consummate unconsummated love story of the new millennium, Wong Kar-wai’s masterpiece fetishizes early-‘60s fashion more thoroughly than several seasons of Mad Men (how many cheongsam dresses can one person own?) and turns Nat King Cole’s Spanish balladry into the official soundtrack of lonely hearts.” –David Fear, Time Out (2010)

Introduction by artist and filmmaker Bo Wang.

Friday, March 20, 9:30 PM
The Rubin Museum of Art, 150 West 17th St.
$10/General Admission

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2) A Boy’s Prayer – Director Chao Koi-wang.  2014. 29 min.  A 17 year old loser meets a mysterious and beautiful cleaner girl by chance. They have totally different characters and backgrounds; However, they start to have a wonderful adventure in garbage dump. Ultimately, they change each other…

Love Express – Director Patrick Xi Hao Chen. 2014. 18 min.  One night, commuting home from the city, Ryan finds himself sitting across a mysterious and heart broken young woman. He takes a chance to reach out and console her that leads him on an emotional journey and sparks the question… could you ever fall in love on a train?

Part of the Queens World Film Festival Assorted Short Stack Program

Saturday, March 21, 12 PM
P.S. 69 Jackson Heights, 77-02 37th Avenue, Jackson Heights
$12/General Admission; $9/Students and Seniors

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3) Blue and Red – Director Zhou Tao.  2014.  25 min.  From anti-government protests in Bangkok to rural areas in China, the march of human life is bathed in vibrant colors, as if under a microscope, in what the artist dubs an “epidermal touch.”

The investigations of the project mostly focusing on the public squares in the city centers of both Guangzhou and Bangkok, as well as a heavy metal mine and rural village which situate in the mountain valley of southern China.

Bathing in the color spectrum, people in the square are stained with the blue ray refracted from nowhere; camping temp groups on the anonymous streets, acidic bright cadmium orange lake surface…all in all with a scent of “epidermal touch”.

Limbs grow and penetrate through the public squares, as close as flesh and blood, the skins attached with the earth crust – he twisted himself against the backdrop of the reality; his hair and the flayed skin, just as vivid and lively as they could be.

Part of MoMA’s New Directors/New Films 2015 Shorts Program 1

Saturday, March 21, 1 PM
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street
$16/General Public; $12/Members & Students

Monday, March 23, 6:15 PM
Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center, 165 W. 65th Street
$16/General Public; $12/Members & Students

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4) K – Director Darhad Erdenibulag, Emyr ap Richard. 2015. China. 88 min.

Franz Kafka’s unfinished novel The Castle is relocated to present-day Inner Mongolia, and the translation is startlingly seamless. Land surveyor K arrives in a frontier village, and soon discovers that his summons was a clerical error. Taking a job as a school janitor, K seeks an audience with the high-level minister he believes will resolve the situation, but he cannot gain access to the castle where the local government is based. Intermittently aided by a barmaid and two hapless minions, K finds his efforts at clarification stymied by local hostility and administrative chaos alike.

Produced by Jia Zhang-ke and rendered with great stylistic economy and a delirious sense of illogic, K is the rare literary adaptation that honors the source material even while reinventing it. At once familiar and strange, the film is both specific to its setting and faithful to Kafka in portraying faceless bureaucracy as a timeless and universal frustration. (MoMA)

North American premiere In Mongolian; English subtitles.

Part of MoMA’s New Directors/New Films 2015

Saturday, March 21, 3:45 PM
Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center, 165 W. 65th Street
$16/General Public; $12/Members & Students

Sunday, March 22, 6 PM
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street
$16/General Public; $12/Members & Students

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5) Carry On – Director Yatao Li. 2014.  16 min. During the brutal withdrawal of Japanese forces at the end of WWII, a Chinese father does whatever he can to save his family.

Part of the Part of the Queens World Film Festival Short Narrative Program

Saturday, March 21, 5:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Astoria
$12/General Admission; $9/Students and Seniors

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6) From Beijing to the Met: A Singing Journey of Hao Jiang Tian – In this retrospective performance and lecture, Hao Jiang Tian will sing and talk about his life as a first generation Chinese-American opera singer, from his exhilarating arrival in 1983 at John F. Kennedy Airport from Beijing, through a two-decade career at the Metropolitan Opera that represented the fulfillment of a dream. There will be ensembles with Tian and young singers from his iSING! Festival.

Hao Jiang Tian has sung over 1300 performances of 40 operatic roles worldwide, including at the Metropolitan Opera for 19 years in 26 operas. He is the founder and artistic director of the iSING! International Young Artists Festival, an initiative introducing Mandarin as a lyric language for young opera singers.

Saturday, March 21, 7 PM
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West
$38/General Admission; $24/Members

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7) Muted Portraits Presents: Brandon Lopez / Joe Morris, Arrington de Dionyso (Old Time Relijun) with Phoebe Osborne, Yi Xin Tong / Gao Jiafeng / Jeff Gretz  – Last set includes an experimental music trio. 

Saturday, March 21, 8:30 PM
Trans Pecos, 915 Wycoff Ave, Queens, New York 11385
$10/General Admission

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8) Asian American Philanthropy – Census data shows Asians representing the nation’s fastest-growing ethnic group, having increased by a staggering 46 percent over the past ten years. With the growth of the population, has comes new affluence and influence across all corridors of industry, from finance to fashion. Asian American emerging leadership in philanthropy will shape the future of the American nonprofit landscape. In this session, we will provide a brief overview of the history of Asian American philanthropy; discuss giving trends across diverse groups that make up this community; and look at opportunities and challenges in fundraising for and by this population.

Speakers:

Linlin Chen, senior research analyst at New York University’s department of University Development and Alumni Relations.

Estee Pierce associate director of prospect research at New York University’s department of University Development and Alumni Relations.

Monday, March 23, 5:30 PM
The Foundation Center – New York, 79 Fifth Avenue, 2nd Floor
Free

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9) Taiwan’s Feminist Movement and the Changing Role of Women: A Literary Perspective – Clark University Assistant Professor Ya-chen Chen discusses feminism in Taiwan from a literary standpoint as part of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute’s Modern Taiwan Lecture Series

Tuesday, March 24, 4:1o PM
Schermerhorn Hall, Room 963, Columbia University
Free

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10) The Taiwanese Table: Cuisine and Identity –  Cathy Erway, author of The Food of Taiwan, leads a panel discussion that includes James Beard Award-winning sommelier Belinda Chang; Brian Tsao, Executive Chef at Mira Sushi & Izikaya; Ken Ho, co-owner and Chef of the innovative Taiwanese-Mexican eatery Lucky Luna, and Matt Gross, “The Frugal Traveler” columnist for The New York Times and former editor of BonAppetit.com.

Following the panel, Cathy will heat up the skillet and crack a few eggs to demonstrate how to make the classic night market dish, the Taiwanese oyster omelet (蚵仔煎). Chef Tsao and restaurants Bian Dang and Lucky Luna will provide Taiwanese snacks to sample.

Tuesday, March 24, 7 PM
The Greene Space, 44 Charlton Street
Sold Out

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11) The Food of Taiwan Book Release Party – Celebrate the release of The Food of Taiwan the next day at Threes Brewery.  Author Cathy Erway will introduce her cookbook and sign copies which can be purchased at the nearby Book Court bookstore.  Mingle and munch on some of the snacks that will be provided.

Wednesday, March 25, 7 PM
Threes Brewing, 333 Douglass Street, Brooklyn
Free

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12) Yuhan Su Quintet – Songs from Su’s upcoming record, A Room of One’s Own, new material, and earlier hits from her first album Flying Alone that have become cellphone ringtones in Taiwan.

Wednesday, March 25, 8:30 PM
The Cornelia Street Cafe, 29 Cornelia Street
$10/Cover + $10/Minimum

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13) The View of Formosa’s Landscape from Photographers – Opening Reception – This exhibition features the work of fifteen photographers from both Taiwan and abroad, documenting Taiwan’s natural and human landscape from a personal angle. Works displayed include photographs by the 19th-century Scottish photographer John Thomson, picturing the dwellings of the Plains Aborigines in the valley of the Laonong River; scenes of swimmers in the Tamsui River shot by the venerable Taiwanese photographer Lee Ming-Tiao in the years shortly after the Retrocession; and gorgeous, vertiginous vistas of Taroko Gorge and Jade Mountain (southeast Asia’s tallest peak) captured by various noted photographers, as well as mist-clouded alpine forests, streams and waterfalls, photos of rare, iconic wild animals in their natural environs, and stunning aerial photographs of Taiwan’s Central Mountains. Audience will be brought back to 19th through the different photographs of Taiwan.

Thursday, March 26, 6 – 8:30 PM
Taipei Economic & Cultural Office in New York, 1 East 42nd Street
Free


Ongoing Films and Shows

1) The World of Extreme Happiness – Unwanted from the moment she’s born, Sunny is determined to escape her life in rural China and forge a new identity in the city. As naïve as she is ambitious, Sunny views her new job in a grueling factory as a stepping stone to untold opportunities. When fate casts her as a company spokeswoman at a sham PR event, Sunny’s bright outlook starts to unravel in a series of harrowing and darkly comic events, as she begins to question a system enriching itself by destroying its own people.  By Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig, and directed by Eric Ting.

February 3 – March 29
New York City Center Stage I, 131 West 55th Street
$85/Admission

2) Lost and Love (失孤) –  Chinese-Hong Kong road drama film written and directed by novelist and television screenwriter Peng Sanyuan in her directorial debut and starring Andy Lau and Jing Boran.  The film is inspired by an actual abduction case in 2010 when a Hubei resident was reunited with his son, who had been missing for three years, when a university student recognized the child after seeing a post on Sina Weibo.

Review by The New York Times

Opens March 20, Check listings at AMC Theatres Empire 25.


Exhibitions

Closing soon:

Jessica Pi-Hua Hsu (徐畢華 / 徐毕华): In Search of Arcadia (Hwang Gallery, 3/3 – 3/22)

Dynamic Writing: A Century of Calligraphy (Flushing Town Hall, 2/22 – 3/22)

Gu Zhongsheng: Gradually Fog Up (Schoolhouse Art Gallery, 2/12 – 3/28)

Lan Zhenghui (蓝正辉 / 藍正輝): Re-thINK (Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, 2/13 – 3/28)

The Art of the Chinese Album (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 3/29) (WSJ Review)

The Chinese Photobook (Aperture Gallery, 2/11 – 4/2)

Transformation & Variation / Face . Book (456 Gallery, 3/5 – 4/3)

Mao Yan at Pace Gallery (3/6 – 4/4)

Asia Art Week New York finishes up on March 21.

Let us know if there’s something people need to see.


Visit the exhibition calendar (http://ow.ly/pxe9o) for details for the following shows below.  As always, check the museum or gallery’s website for hours of operation.  We’ve noted exhibitions for which a review has been published.

Jessica Pi-Hua Hsu (徐畢華 / 徐毕华): In Search of Arcadia (Hwang Gallery, 3/3 – 3/22)

Dynamic Writing: A Century of Calligraphy (Flushing Town Hall, 2/22 – 3/22)

Gu Zhongsheng: Gradually Fog Up (Schoolhouse Art Gallery, 2/12 – 3/28)

Lan Zhenghui (蓝正辉 / 藍正輝): Re-thINK (Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, 2/13 – 3/28)

The Art of the Chinese Album (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 3/29) (WSJ Review)

The Chinese Photobook (Aperture Gallery, 2/11 – 4/2)

Transformation & Variation / Face . Book (456 Gallery, 3/5 – 4/3)

Mao Yan at Pace Gallery (3/6 – 4/4)

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F (The Kitchen, 512 W 19th St, 3/5 – 4/11)

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion (New York Historical Society, 4/19)

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution (China Institute, 4/26) (review)

Shen Shaomin (沉少民 / 沈少民) : Handle with Care (小心轻放 / 小心輕放) (Klein Sun Gallery, 3/7 – 5/2)

Yan Shanchun (严善錞): West Lake (西湖) (Chambers Fine Art, 2/26 – 5/9)

The View of Formosa’s Landscape from Photographers (Taipei Cultural Center of TECO, 3/13 – 5/15)

Fertility, Blessings, and  Protection – Taiwanese and Asian Cultures of Baby Carrier (Charles B. Wang Center at Stony Brook University, 3/11 – 7/11)

Image: Statue seen in Yingge, Taiwan