Events and Exhibitions: April 17 – April 23, 2015

Bell Tower, Xi’an

We said last week that the weekly post listed the most number of events this year, so far.  This week, there are even more.   Tai chi meets Lou Reed.  A guitar duo.  And films.  Lots of them.  A nature film, ninja flicks, films by female Taiwanese directors, a retrospective of one of Taiwan’s greats, documentaries at the Tribeca Film Festival, a biopic about an artist who suffered through the Cultural Revolution, experimental films inspired by the Beijing Silvermine photo project…

It’s the last weekend for the New-York Historical Society’s excellent Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion exhibition.  The museum is right next to the Museum of Natural History and Central Park.  Why not swing by while you’re out this weekend?

Coming up:

Fou Gallery is back with a new exhibition, Vanitas/Traces on April 24.

On April 27, The Asian American Writers Workshop hosts Leaving and Returning to China, a discussion about what it means to immigrate from China and return.

We add listings to our one-time and short term event and ongoing exhibition calendars as we learn of them.  If you know of anything or would like to contribute photos or an article, shoot us an email at beyondchinatown@gmail.com.


Upcoming Events

1) Master Ren: Taijiquan Demonstration and Panel Featuring Lou Reed’s Drones – Tai chi master Ren Guangyi (任廣義), with whom renowned musician Lou Reed the healthful martial art, hosts a demonstration of this technique accompanied by Lou Reed’s DRONES. A panel discussion will follow that features Master Ren and a number of his notable students including  Sarth Calhoun, Hsia-Jung Chang, Ren Guangyi, Amanda Harmon, Jonathan Miller, Bill O’Connor, Dan Richman and Tony Visconti. (New York Live Arts)

Friday, April 17, 6 PM
New York Live Arts Theater, 219 W. 19th Street
Tickets: $15 – $40

+++++

2) Rebels of the Neon God / 《青少年哪吒》 – Dir. Tsai Ming-liang. 1992, 106 mins. Archival 35mm print. With Chen Chao-jung, Jen Chang-bin, Lee Kang-sheng. “A tender/tough survey of beautiful, dissolute Taipei youth on their nightly prowls of fluorescent-lit food courts and video arcades.” (Dennis Lim, The Village Voice.) Tsai’s startling debut feature concerns a listless student, Hsiao-kang (Lee), who drops out of cram school without telling his parents, played here by Lu Hsiao-ling and Miao Tien. With his free days and stolen tuition, Hsiao follows around the pack of hoodlums who broke his cab-driver father’s rearview mirror—Ah-tze, Ah-ping, and Ah-tze’s girlfriend, Ah-kuei—with his fixation on Ah-tze lingering in an unresolved space between kid-brother idolization and erotic longing. Rebels of a Neon God features expressive elements which would disappear from Tsai’s later work, including a propulsive synth theme and handheld camerawork.  (Museum of the Moving Image)

Reviews from The New York Times, RogerEbert.com, and The A.V. Club.

Part of the series Tsai Ming-liang.

Also screens at Quad Cinema through April 21. See below for the link.

Friday, April 17, 7 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Ave, Astoria
$12/Admission;  $9/Senior Citizens and Students

+++++

3) A Life of Ninja 《亡命忍者》 – Dir. Lee Tso-nam (李作楠).  1983, 88 min, 35mm, in Mandarin with English subtitles. Chen Kuan-tai (陳觀泰) is ninja-pooper: he knows ninja, but poops their parties.  Police ask for help, he been in many martial art movie (like Crippled Avengers), he must help police.  He says yes.  Yes, I fight ninja.  He fight the ninja?!?  Ninja get furious.  Use hypno-mind-control killers, flying snakes, tiny bombs, poison ink, swords and knives, even get World Wrestling Champion Wong Kin-mi to wear little red briefs and turn over cars. And stomp! And kill! Big fights!  Then Chen Kuan-tai fight the head ninja, Yasuaki Kurata, in secret ninja fort. There can be only one.  Is exciting! You must see A Life of Ninja to believe A Life of Ninja!

Part of Subway Cinema’s Old School Kung Fu Fest ’15: Enter the Ninjas!! series.

Friday, April 17, 10:15 PM
Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Ave
$10/Admission

+++++

4) Duel to the Death / 《生死決》 – Dir. Ching Siu-tung ((程小東).  1983, 83min, DCP, in Cantonese with English subtitles.  The first movie from Hong Kong’s great action director, Ching Siu-tung, Swordsman II (笑傲江湖之東方不敗), House of Flying Daggers (十面埋伏)) is a fever dream of freaky pictures ripped straight outta your id, a bizzaro whirlwind of flashing blades, teleporting demons, and killer puppets.  Once every 10 years, Japanese and Chinese fighters duel (to the death) to figure out who will rule the martial world.  But this time, they detect a conspiracy! They detect…ninjas!  Kite ninjas, burrowing ninjas, giant ninjas — it’s a ninja hoedown! As a young boy, Ching read Martial Arts World Magazine and dreamed up weird ways to make kung fu cooler. Then he made this movie and showed the world that kung fu could only be cooler if the king of ninjas had an exploding head. (Subway Cinema)

Part of Subway Cinema’s Old School Kung Fu Fest ’15: Enter the Ninjas!! series.

Saturday, April 18, 1 PM
Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Ave
$10/Admission

+++++

 

5) Sleeping on Dark Waters / 《沉睡在黑水上》and Madam Butterfly – Dir. Tsai Ming-liang. 2008, 53 mins. Digital projection. A documentary on the shooting of the 2006 film I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone in Tsai’s homeland of Malaysia, Sleeping on Dark Waters combines personal history with a privileged glimpse into the notoriously camera-shy director’s working methodology. Preceded by Madam Butterfly (2009, 36 mins. Digital projection), Tsai’s first shot-on-digital work. Commissioned for the centenary of Puccini’s birth, this idiosyncratic reinterpretation of the opera of the same title made in Kuala Lumpur with I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone actress Pearly Chua is comprised of only three shots, anticipating changes in his work spurred by new possibilities offered by digital cameras. (Museum of the Moving Image)

Saturday, April 18, 4:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Ave, Astoria
$12/Admission;  $9/Senior Citizens and Students

Part of the series Tsai Ming-liang

+++++

6) Five Element Ninjas / 《五遁忍術》 – Dir. Chang Cheh(張徹). 1982. 103 minutes. 35mm, in Mandarin with English subtitles.  In the 80s, Shaw Brothers was losing audiences to TV and so they decided to glue butts to seats by hiring Chang Cheh to direct his most insane movie ever.  A Chinese martial arts clan is fighting everyone and winning but then they fight ninjas.  Ninjas who know Five Element Formation!  So secret!  So deadly!  The only survivor learns that in order to beat ninja…he must become ninja!  Ninja fights using Gold Powers, Wood Powers, Water Powers, Earth Powers, Fire Powers!  Chinese martial arts man uses Hitting Ninjas in Face Power! Trees bleed.  Crotches are stabbed.  Guts are extracted.  Every second of this movie is high-octane man-against-ninja action and it does not end until every inch of the screen is covered in dead ninja. (Subway Cinema)

Part of Subway Cinema’s Old School Kung Fu Fest ’15: Enter the Ninjas!! series.

Saturday, April 18, 5 PM
Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Ave
$10/Admission

+++++

7) Snakeskin – Dir. Daniel Hui.  2014. 105 Min.  A striking vérité snapshot of present-day Singapore that doubles as a semi-mystical cinematic incantation conjuring ghosts from the country’s history, Daniel Hui’s Snakeskiningeniously compresses past, present, and future. In 2066, the lone survivor of a cult projects footage shot by his divine leader, who claimed to be the reincarnation of Stamford Raffles, the British statesman who founded Singapore. Both living and dead subjects candidly reminisce about love, race, revolution, and the Malay film industry as muted images from 2014 of the city-state’s streets and harbors—key locations of the cult’s future founding—flash by.

Followed by a Q&A with director Daniel Hui.

Part of Film Society’s Art of the Real series.

Saturday, April 18, 6:30 PM
Francesca Beale Theater, 144 West 65th Street
$14/General Public; $11/Seniors, Students, and Affiliates; $9/Film Society Members

+++++

8) I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone / 《黑眼圈》 – Dir. Tsai Ming-liang. 2006, 115 mins. 35mm. With Lee Kang-sheng, Chen Shiang-chyi, Norman Atun. In his first film shot in Kuala Lumpur, the Malaysian-born Tsai returns home and looks empathetically at the city’s polyglot migrant population. A matrix of dependency forms as a Bangladeshi living in a massive, abandoned building invites a Chinese drifter to share his mattress, and the drifter in turn becomes involved with a woman who is caring for the comatose son of her boss. “Culminates with a transcendent vision of doomsday love. Even by Tsai’s elevated standards, the final shot is one of otherworldly beauty.” (Dennis Lim, The Village Voice).

Part of the series Tsai Ming-liang

Saturday, April 18, 7 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Ave, Astoria
$12/Admission;  $9/Senior Citizens and Students

+++++

9) God Man Dog /《流浪神狗人》– An urban couple’s marriage is in crisis, so they go on a trip to eastern Taiwan, hoping to revive their relationship. An impoverished aboriginal couple, toils to transport peaches from a remote tribe in Taidong to Taipei every day. A man and a homeless boy collect all sorts of amulets to earn blessings. Then there’s a fatal car accident and the lives of the three groups of characters converge. (TECO)

Directed by Shining Chen 陳芯宜

Part of Taiwan Cultural Center’s Female Directors from Taiwan series

Sunday, April 19 2 PM
Mid-Manhattan Library, 455 5th Avenue
Free

+++++

10) Passing on the Kunqu Art: From Master to Disciples – This Kunqu Society performance introduces four signature plays of Kunqu Master Jiqing Zhang to American audiences: “A Maddening Dream,” an episode from “Ballad of The Rotten-Ax Mountain”, “A Stroll in the Garden,” “An Interrupted Dream,” and “Dreamland Revisited,” three episodes from “The Peony Pavilion” (by Xianzu Tang in 1598 A.D.)

Saturday, April 19, 2 PM
Miller Theater at Columbia University, 2960 Broadway, New York
$22/General Admission; $15/Student; $10/Columbia University Student

+++++

11) Face (Visage) /《臉》 – Dir. Tsai Ming-liang. 2009, 138 mins. 35mm. With Lee Kang-sheng, Lu Yi-ching, Fanny Ardant, Jean-Pierre Léaud, Laetitia Casta, Jeanne Moreau, Mathieu Amalric. Tsai’s second film set in France—partially financed by and shot in the Louvre—is perhaps his most unapologetically ravishing, imagistic work to date. Lee plays a director who arrives in Paris to film his version of Salomé myth, who finds himself chasing an elusive vision while struggling to deal with the death of his mother and, yes, plumbing problems. The Christian Lacroix-costumed cast includes New Wave icons Jean-Pierre Léaud (whose relationship to François Truffaut mirrored Lee’s to Tsai), Fanny Ardant, Nathalie Baye, and Jeanne Moreau, choices which reflect Tsai’s deep debt to French cinema, in particular Truffaut, who is a constant reference point here.

Introduced by La Frances Hui, film curator at Asia Society.

Part of the series Tsai Ming-liang

Sunday, April 19, 6:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Ave, Astoria
$12/Admission;  $9/Senior Citizens and Students

+++++

12) Stranded in Canton – Lebrun is an entrepreneur from The Democratic Republic of Congo who goes to China intent on making a fortune selling political T-shirts. When things don’t go as planned Lebrun spends more time in karaoke bars and falling in love than he does on business. Somewhere between documentary and fiction, this fascinating story explores new trade routes and their impact in two separate continents.

Part of the Tribeca Film Festival.

Sunday, April 19, 6:45 PM
Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea, 260 W. 23rd Street
$21.50/General Admission

Tuesday, April 21, 3:45 PM
Regal Cinemas, Battery Park
$13.50/General Admission

Tuesday, April 22, 7:30 PM
Regal Cinemas, Battery Park
$21.50/General Admission

Sunday, April 15, 6:45 PM
Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea, 260 W. 23rd Street
$21.50/General Admission

+++++

13) Still Matters  – Inspired by Recycled, an experimental film that animated images from the Beijing Silvermine project, “this screening will include a selection of works from experimental filmmakers and artists who explore innovative formal approaches in their reconstructions of place and memory on moving image.”

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Lei Lei, photographer Daniel Traub, and curator Xin Zhou.

Sunday, April 12, 2 PM
Union Docs, 322 Union Ave, Brooklyn
$9/Admission

+++++

14) Slow Made in China: Transmitting Cultural DNA (no link as of press time)– For Chinese Language Day, 11 masters of Chinese folk art from 8 provinces of China will show amazing works in various media such as embroidery, paper cutting, silver inlay, olive nut carving.  Artists will also present talks, and attendees will be able to try their hand at these crafts.

Friday, April 20, 5:30 – 8:30 PM
Secretariat Building, 3rd Floor, 760 United Nations Plaza
Free

+++++

15) All Eyes and Ears – When former Utah governor Jon Huntsman was appointed United States Ambassador to China, the charming career politician arrived at his new post with his entire family—including his adopted Chinese daughter, Gracie. Huntsman’s diplomatic struggles and triumphs are explored in the broader context of China’s relationship with the rest of the world, and intersected with Gracie’s personal experience living in China as a Chinese-American.

Part of the Tribeca Film Festival.

Monday, April 20, 6:45 PM
Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea, 260 W. 23rd Street
Rush tickets available

Tuesday, April 21, 5 PM
Regal Cinemas, Battery Park
$13.50/General Admission

Thursday, April 23, 3:30 PM
Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea, 260 W. 23rd Street
Limited tickets available

Friday, April 24, 9:45 PM
Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea, 260 W. 23rd Street
Rush tickets available

+++++

16) Taiwan’s Popular Culture and its Impact on China, East Asia, and Beyond – Marc Moskowitz, University of South Carolina talks about the influence of Taiwan’s popular culture in China, East Asia, and beyond.

Part of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute’s Modern Taiwan Lecture Series.

Tuesday, April 21, 6:30 PM
Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Ave, Astoria
$12/Admission;  $9/Senior Citizens and Students

17) The Timeless Book of Songs – The Book of Songs (詩經), an anthology of 300 songs-turned-poems from 1,100 to 600 B.C., compiled by Confucius (551-479 B.C.) among other scholars, is the first piece of literature of China. Timeless and beautiful, it remains as the glorious fountainhead of Chinese culture, from which all the later literary works and other cultural genres were derived. Subjects of these poems range from love, compassion and lamentation to laud and glorification. Its most outstanding descendants are the three poetic genres flourished from the 7th century through the 15th century: Tang poetry (shi, 詩), Song poetry (, 词) and Yuan poetry (曲).

One of the most acclaimed courses taught by Ben Wang, Senior Lecture of Language and Humanities of the China Institute and award-winning translator, the Book of Songs and its quintessential spirit will be introduced and explored in the original texts of selected poems. Mr. Wang will offer this lecture in English. No previous knowledge of the Chinese language is required. (China Institute)

Tuesday, April 21, 6:30 PM
China Institute, 125 E. 65th St.
$25/Members; $30/Non-members

+++++

18) Mystery Monkeys of Shangri-la – Representing the meticulous and ambitious work of an all-Chinese film company led by award-winning filmmaker Xi Zhinong, this spectacular film is the true story of a family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living in the highest forests in the world. Only recently discovered, snub-nosed monkeys are hauntingly beautiful primates, different and gentler than others of their kind. Elfin-like, they seem both childlike and wise beyond their years. The family is led by a formidable fighter and his crew, who together stand guard for eight to 10 families. This is a unique monkey society, formed in response to the hardships of the Himalayas. But their survival depends not just upon strong defensive strategies; it also relies upon the cooperation and interdependence of them all.  (Asia Society)

The film is narrated by American actor BD Wong.

Post-screening Q&A with filmmaker Xi Zhinong, writer and editor Mark Fletcher, and Michael Zhao, a video producer at Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations.

Wednesday, April 22, 6:30 PM
Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York
$8/Members; $10/Students/Seniors; $12/nonmembers

+++++

19) Art and the Cultural Revolution: A Conversation with Zheng Shengtian – Born in 1938 and now Managing Editor of Yishu magazine, Zheng Shengtian is an artist, writer and independent curator. Prior to his departure from China in 1990, he worked at Zhejiang Academy of Art in Hangzhou (now the China Art Academy) as a professor and chair of the Oil Painting Department. This conversation with Jane Jane DeBevoise, Chair, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong and New York will focus on Professor Zheng’s experience during the Cultural Revolution, its impact on his education, art practice, and teaching responsibilities, including his work with artists who came to prominence in the 1980s and beyond.
ists

Wednesday, April 15, 6 PM
China Institute in New York, 125 E. 65th St.
$10/Member; $15/Non-members;  FREE to Friends of the Gallery Members

+++++

20) Health and Social Activism of Self-Identified Gay Men in Post-Socialist China – A talk by SUNY Cortland Professor Tiantian Zheng, whose research interests focus on cultural politics of gender, sex, class, migration, and power during the political, social, and cultural transformations in post-socialist China.

Tuesday, April 14, 5 PM
International Affairs Building, Room 918, Columbia University
Free

+++++

21) Dreaming Against the World – While imprisoned during China’s Cultural Revolution, the artist Mu Xin risked his life writing and painting in solitary confinement. It was through his daily artistic meditations that he survived, while so many others did not. After immigrating to New York in the early 1980s, Mu Xin continued his ink painting and calligraphy practice in obscurity for close to 20 years before being discovered at the age of 74 to great critical acclaim. Filmed on location in China and New York, Dreaming Against the World is the story of Mu Xin, one of the most original and under recognized contemporary Chinese artists of the past century, and his incredible commitment to his artistic vision and integrity. A Ropa Vieja Films and Half Mile Hill Production. (Asia Society)

Post-screening discussion with film directors Timothy Sternberg, Francisco Bello, joined by Chen Danqing, art critic and painter, and Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator of Asian Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The discussion is moderated by Michelle Yun, Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Asia Society.

Thursday, April 16, 6:30 PM
Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York
Sold out

22) China West Concert with Manuel Barrueco, Beijing Guitar Duo – Manuel Barrueco, internationally recognized as one of the most important guitarists of our time and hailed by The New York Times as “a superior musician,” teams up with his protégés the Beijing Guitar Duo, about whom Fanfare Magazine wrote: “Speed? Clarity? Timing? Finesse? Ensemble playing? It turned out the Beijing Guitar Duo had it all.” They will present a special concert that includes solos, duos, and trios from China and the West.

Thursday, April 23, 7 PM
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West
$34/General Admission; $20/Members


Ongoing Films and Shows

1) Rebels of the Neon God /《青少年哪吒》 – The film gets a screening at a third venue, Quad Cinema in Greenwich Village.

Tsai Ming-liang’s feature debut introduces antihero Hsiao-kang (Lee Kang-sheng, who has reprised the role in nearly all of Tsai’s later works, including Stray Dogs, NYFF51), a sullen youth sharing a Taipei apartment with his mother and cabbie father who believes he’s the reincarnation of a spiteful god. Something of a low-key anarchist, Hsiao-kang impulsively drops out of his college-prep course and pockets the tuition money. Striking out on his own, he falls in with the bikers who vandalized his father’s cab (Chen Chao-jung and Jen Chang-bin) and the disaffected girl (Wang Yu-wen) who follows them around. A stark but sympathetic portrait of teenage alienation, Rebels of the Neon God reimagines Rebel Without a Cause amid a nocturnal landscape of urban decay, a Taipei bathed in the glow of arcade machines, noisy mopeds and festering back-alley sludge. A perversely funny and haunting sign of things to come in Tsai’s singular and acclaimed career, Rebels of the Neon God deserves to be counted among the most auspicious debuts of the past several decades. A Big World Pictures release. (Film Society)

Reviews from The New York Times, RogerEbert.com, and The A.V. Club.

See the Quad Cinema page for screening times.

April17 – April 21
Quad Cinema, 34 W. 13th Street

+++++

2) Let’s Get Married / 《咱们结婚吧》 / 《咱們結婚吧》– Wenwen, the owner of a bridal boutique, longs to find Mr. Right and walk down the aisle in one of her beautiful wedding gowns. Yi Wen, a violinist, wavers over her engagement after meeting a mysterious man in a foreign country. Lei Xiao, an airport employee, tries to forcehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ED-iZFj0wSA her pilot boyfriend to marry her. And Hai Xin, a successful business woman, finds herself in a broken marriage and unexpectedly pregnant. Based on the hugely popular Chinese TV series of the same name, Let’s Get Married follows the lives of four couples looking for love and to find that special someone to say “I do.”

Opens April 3.  Check listings at AMC Empire 25


Exhibitions

Just added and Opening:

1) Wong Kit Yi: North Pole Futures (K., 334 Broome Street, April 12 – 26) – A solo exhibition by Hong Kong / New York-based artist Wong Kit Yi. For the duration of the show, Ali Wong, investment manager for Wong Kit Yi, offers intrepid collectors a chance to commission a custom-made work, which will be created by the artist this fall on a sailing expedition to the North Pole.
Prospective patrons may choose three elements out of Wong’s lists: a date, a color, and a weird word. These three terms will be combined together in a photographic, sculptural, performative, or painterly manner in the Arctic. The price of each work is generated by a complex calculation that factors together weather conditions, sun cover, moon illumination, and randomized variables; this determines both the artwork price and a percentage of the sale that will be donated to a nonprofit organization of the artist’s choosing. Patrons thus become co-producers, fellow adventurers, speculative investors, and inadvertent philanthropists all at once.

The multi-media exhibition features texts, objects, and time-based works. Video interviews with select experts — including an art dealer, a commodities trader, a pawnbroker, and a fishmonger — consider the nature and techniques of valuation and pricing. The exhibition also features a publication and website wongfutures.com for contracting the artworks.

There are only a limited number of contracts for sale, so don’t wait to invest in the future now.

+++++

2) Myth and Mutations (REVERSE, 28 Frost Street, Brooklyn, April 10 – May 2) – Features six artists that combine symbols of the past with subject matter found in contemporary culture including emojis, memes, video games, and consumer products. The artists demonstrate that mythologies forever transform, coalesce, and split into new allegories. However, as these allegories undergo certain metamorphic changes, they acquire a close relation to present-day desires, fears, truths, and morals. On display is a diverse range of mediums including video installation, animation, illustration, and 3D printed sculpture.

“Ambient Occlusion” a series of 3D printed sculptures by Wang Fe-Yeng combines and breaks apart the human figure, American automobiles and beasts of Chinese and Greco-Roman fables. The figures, posed in classical Renaissance form also contain attributes of the Chinese dragon and the centaur. In the video animation “Pink Fall Mountain With Ginseng Exercise”

+++++

3) The Hugo Boss Prize 2014: Paul Chan, Nonprojections for New Lovers (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 3/6 – 5/13) – The work features power-conducted shoes connected to a set of projectors, which flicker and strobe into space to create illegible images. There is also a white nylon structure that is propped by moving fans as well as prototypes for Chan’s new erotic book series called New Lovers (published by his company Badlands Unlimited). To supplement the exhibit, three writers will read from the book series tomorrow at the museum, giving a whole new dimension to Chan’s incredibly diverse use of mixed media. (Complex)

Closing soon:

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion (New York Historical Society, 4/19)

Beyond the Surface: Contemporary Photography Group Exhibition (Ouchi Gallery, 4/14 – 4/19)

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution (China Institute, 4/26) (review)

Let us know if there’s something people need to see.


Visit the exhibition calendar (http://ow.ly/pxe9o) for details for the following shows below.  As always, check the museum or gallery’s website for hours of operation.  We’ve noted exhibitions for which a review has been published.

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion (New York Historical Society, 4/19)

Beyond the Surface: Contemporary Photography Group Exhibition (Ouchi Gallery, 4/14 – 4/19)

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution (China Institute, 4/26) (review)

Wong Kit Yi: North Pole Futures (K., 4/12 – 4/26)

Shen Shaomin (沉少民 / 沈少民) : Handle with Care (小心轻放 / 小心輕放) (Klein Sun Gallery, 3/7 – 5/2)

Myth and Mutations (REVERSE,  4/10 – 5/2)

Yan Shanchun (严善錞): West Lake (西湖) (Chambers Fine Art, 2/26 – 5/9)

The Hugo Boss Prize 2014: Paul Chan, Nonprojections for New Lovers (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 3/6 – 5/13)

The View of Formosa’s Landscape from Photographers (Taipei Cultural Center of TECO, 3/13 – 5/15)

The School of Nature and Principle (EFA Project Space, 4/10 – 5/30)

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera (Grey Art Gallery, 4/21 – 7/11)

Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong (Museum of Chinese in America, 3/26 – 9/13)

Image: Bell Tower of Xi’an (西安钟楼), Photo by Andrew Shiue